PERUGIA

Perugia was the ancient centre of the Umbrians called Peroscia, then an Dodecapoli Etruscan City by the name of Perusia (in 310 BC it was thought to be one of the most important Etruscan cities) then a Roman centre after seeing victory against the Etruscans and with the alliance to Rome.

Reconstructed by Augusto and named Augusta Perusia, it soon returned to a prosperous city. It has maintained a good amount of its original structure. After expansion of the old walled city during medieval times, the City underwent huge building renovation. Devastated by Totila, conquered by Narsete, it finally fell into the hands of the Longobards who turned it into a Duchy seat (6th Century). This move passed it under the protection and sovereignty of the Church (8th Century), as well as being under the Guelph insignia, against the neighbouring centres of Gubbio, Arezzo, Siena, Todi, Foligno and Assisi. It became a Papal residence (13th Century) and saw the building of many of its famous monuments as well as more than 70 towers, which were built on the wishes of the appellative of Turrena. Having to overcome the collapse of its land, the City expanded in a stellar form, with the historical districts of Porta Sole, Porta Sant’Angelo, Porta Eburnea, Porta Santa Susanna and Porta San Pietro, each one being characterized by an ample central road and numerous tortuous and narrow lateral roads. It was not however, immune to the struggles between factions: at the end of the 14th Century, it was given to Gian Galeazzo Visconti, Duke of Milan; then ruled under Braccio da Montone (1416-1424), and the Baglioni’s against the Oddi, which saw a bloody battle until the end of 540, the year in which the City was devastated by Pier Luigi Farnese on behalf of Pope Paul III. In the 16th Century, communal freedom was extinguished, and Pope Paul III had the district which was built on the hills of Landone abolished, where Antonio da Sangallo il Giovane, erected the fortress which took its name from the Pope: La Rocca Paolina (demolished in 1859, due to mob violence). The communal magistrates, with only administrative powers, were all replaced in power by the successor of Paolo III, Giulio III, and the City flourished once again. During French domination (1798-1814) it was part of the department of Trasimeno. In June 1859, the over zealous Papal troops (“Stragi di Perugia”) came down heavily on the rebellious Perugians who destroyed the Rocca Paolini and who were then subsequently liberated from Papal dominion on the arrival of the troops from Piemonte (September 1860).

A modern system of mechanised routes, constituted by a series of long scale furniture, running in part on the exterior and in part on the interior of ancient buildings, allows an easy assent to the historical centre in the hills. The renowned Umbria Jazz, one of the most important European festivals in its field, takes place annually in Perugia and its principal centres.

PAGE 1 | 2 | next >>

PERUGIA
Art City

Umbria region of Italy

 

City Guide
art profile
museums

Travel Perugia
Perugia hotels

 

Art Cities in Umbria
Perugia
Terni
More Art Cities in Umbria
Amelia
Assisi
Bevagna
Cascia
Castiglione del Lago
Città delle Pieve
Città di Castello
Deruta
Foligno
Gualdo Tadino
Gubbio
Magione
Marsciano
Montefalco
Narni
Nocera Umbra
Norcia
Orvieto
Spello
Spoleto
Todi
Trevi
Umbertide

In Italy Today
Italy Guides:
> Art Cities
> Full List
> Italy Regions
Exhibitions Events
Hotels B&Bs

 



ART TRAVEL LINK - SELECTED WEB SITES

  • Your ArtTravelSite - http://www.yoursite.com
    Description of the site.
  • ... ask to put your art-link here!

 


Vuoi inserire un LINK?
Hai un HOTEL o un'altra attività legata al TURISMO IN ITALIA?

Promuovilo nella pagina della tua città dentro IN ITALY TODAY!
OFFERTE PROMOZIONALI PER I PRIMI LINK

Art Travel directory

SUGGEST AN ART/TRAVEL-SITE

 

In Italy Today loves art

© IN ITALY HOTELS NETWORK