Brindisi - Cathedral
This is a file from the Wikimedia Commons. Click the pic to see its description page and licensing.

BRINDISI

Its territory was inhabited since Palaeolithic times, as shown by finds which can now be seen in the Provincial Archaeological Museum.

In particular, south of the port in the Punta le Terrare locality where a village from the Middle Bronze Ages (17th Century) has been discovered. Here there are also finds of Mycenaean ceramics, confirming strong commercial exchange with other areas of the Mediterranean Sea.
The City was founded by the Messapians, a populous with Illyrian origins, who arrived along the coast of Puglia during the 8th Century BC, and became part of the dodecapoli with the name of Brention or Brentesion, meaning “Red Deer Head,” probably deriving from the shape of the port.
After Pirro’s disembarkation in Italy (280 BC), which came about to counteract the spread of Roman power and to protect the Greek colony in Taranto, and after its proverbial victories, Brindisi became a Roman colony in 266 BC, as well as main harbour of reference on the Adriatic coast. To confirm this, Via Appia (Appian Way) or Regina Viarum, which connected Rome to Capua, Benevento and Oria, terminated at Brindisi.
On his return from Greece, the great poet Virgil, died on 19th September, 19 BC.
During the Imperial era, the City was equipped with thermal baths, forums and was obviously the link between the Eastern and Western areas of the Roman Empire.
With the advent of Christianity, the City became an Episcopal seat.
After the fall of the Roman Empire (5th Century BC) and the devastation of the Visigoths, Eruli and Vandals, Brindisi was quickly annexed to the Ostrogoth Reign, which they took over from the Byzantines during the Greek-Gothic war (535-553). It then passed hands to the Longobards who destroyed it in 674, but who, however, never succeeded in its domination as they halted further north of the region. It was a Byzantine stronghold until the 10th Century, then suffered attack by the Saracens (10th Century), who were by then owners of Sicily since the 9th Century.
The Normans, who landed in Puglia from Northern Europe at the beginning of the second millennium, only conquered Brindisi in 1070. Under their domination new construction of the Cathedral (1132), the San Benedetto Church (1089) began, whilst under their Swabian successors, construction of the Castle was initiated.
Many knights and soldiers departed from here on their way to the Crusades and the freedom of the Holy Land which was dominated by Muslims. Emperor, Federick II, embarked from here, heading the sixth Crusade in 1228.
With the advent of the Angioini (1274), the City, for a brief period, fell under Venetian domination then was struck by the Plague in 1348.
In 1441, after the fall of Naples, it was conquered by Alfonso Vth of Aragona, and given to the Del Balzo Orsini Family.
In 1456, it was devastated by a violent earthquake, and then fell into disgrace, which was resolved thanks to Venice, which activated shipyards here and equipped the port for commercial traffic (1496).
The Spanish, 13 years later, were once again in possession of the City, allowing the port to return to a state of abandonment. It also remained this way under Bourbon domination (1734).
It was only after unification to the Reign of Italy in 1860, that the port was reborn and became part of the Valigia delle Indie, that is a railway and marine line, which arrived in Bombay from London, passing through Brindisi (1870 to 1914). For a short period. Brindisi was also capital of Italy during the Second World War between 10th September 1943 and 11th February 1944.
A visit to the City can begin from Federick the Great’s Swabian Castle (13th Century), constructed with material from the ancient Roman amphitheatre and move on to the Aragonese Castle (1491) which was constructed as a defence structure for the City in case of eventual sea attacks. Close by, one can visit the Great Fountain or Tancredi, a Roman construction which was restored by Tancredi of Altavilla in 1192.
The Roman Cathedral, reconstructed after the 1743 earthquake, can be found in Piazza Duomo, where one can also visit the Portico dei Cavalieri Templari (Portal of the Templar Knights - 14th Century). Among the many churches worth mentioning, we would like to point out the Romanesque-Gothic Church of Saint Maria of Casale, the Romanesque Church of Christ (1232), Saint Benedetto (11th Century) and San Giovanni al Sepolcro (12th Century).

PAGE 1

BRINDISI
Art City

Puglia (Apulia) region of Italy

 

City Guide
art profile
museums

Travel in Brindisi
Brindisi hotels

 

Art Cities in Apulia
Bari
Andria
Barletta
Brindisi
Foggia
Lecce
Taranto
Trani
More Art Cities in Apulia
Acaya
Alberobello
Alezio
Altamura
Ascoli Satriano
Bisceglie
Bitonto
Bovino
Calimera
Canosa
Casarano
Castel del Monte
Castellaneta
Ceglie Messapica
Cerignola
Cisternino
Conversano
Copertino
Cutrofiano

Francavilla Fontana

Galatina
Gallipoli
Gioia del Colle
Giovinazzo
Gravina
Grottaglie
Isole Tremiti
Locorotondo
Lucera
Maglie
Manduria
Manfredonia
Martano
Martina Franca
Massafra
Melendugno
Melpignano
Mesagne
Modugno
Molfetta
Monopoli
Monte Sant'Angelo
Nardò
Ostuni
Otranto
Parabita
Peschici
Poggiardo
Polignano a Mare
Putignano
Ruvo di Puglia
San Ferdinando di Puglia
San Vito dei Normanni
San Severo
Specchia
Terlizzi
Tricase
Troia
Ugento
Vico del Gargano
Vieste
Archaeological Sites
Egnazia
Ordona (Herdonia)
Oria
Siponto

In Italy Today
Italy Guides:
> Art Cities
> Full List
> Italy Regions
Exhibitions Events
Hotels B&Bs

 



ART TRAVEL LINK - SELECTED WEB SITES

  • Your TravelSite - http://www.yoursite.com
    Description of the site.
  • ... ask to put your link here!

 


Vuoi inserire un LINK?
Hai un HOTEL o un'altra attività legata al TURISMO IN ITALIA?

Promuovilo nella pagina della tua città dentro IN ITALY TODAY!
OFFERTE PROMOZIONALI PER I PRIMI LINK

Art Travel directory

SUGGEST AN ART/TRAVEL-SITE

 

In Italy Today loves art

© IN ITALY HOTELS NETWORK